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International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry in Kautokeino opened by the current Prime Minister of Norway 10 years ago today

September 2, 2015 • Svein MathiesenBlog, ICR/WRH, Nomadic Herders, Projects, UArctic EALAT InstituteLeave a comment

International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (ICR) in Kautokeino was opened by then the Minister of Local Governement and Regional Development, Mrs. Erna Solberg on September 2, 2005.

 

In her opening speech, Mrs. Solberg stressed that the establishment of the Centre is a contribution from Norway to maintain and strengthen the international cooperation in reindeer husbandry, and that it would add another dimension to the cooperation of the Arctic Council and the Barents Region. She also emphasized that the Government considers it important that the reindeer herders and their organizations have a close relationship to the Centre: “… We have therefore emphasized that the Centre to be established and operated in cooperation with the Association of World Reindeer Herders (WRH).”

 

Mrs. Solberg also emphasized the importance of traditional knowledge of reindeer husbandry in her opening speech: “… It is particularly crucial that the knowledge is accepted and used in education systems, research and, not at least, in public management. We have made little use of reindeer husbandry’s own experience and knowledge in our management of reindeer husbandry in Norway in the last 30 years,” said Mrs. Solberg before she rounded:” … The goal must be that future generations recognize the value of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge as essential skills in harvesting and management of nature, climate and environment. The aim must be to achieve a better and more appropriate management of indigenous livelihoods and areas in which the indigenous peoples live.»

19_73-sak1a-bilde3

The Government was also represented by the Minister of Children and Family Affairs, Mrs. Laila Dåvøy, State Secretary, Mrs. Ellen Inga O Hætta in the Ministery of Local Government and Regional Development, and State Secretary, Mr. Vidar Helgesen in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the opening ceremony in Kautokeino in 2005.

 

In the anniversary year 2015, ten years after the opening of the ICR, the Prime Minister of Norway, Mrs. Erna Solberg said in her speech at the Sami Parliament’s plenary, 3 July:

“… The International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry – which was established in 2005 – has also contributed in promoting knowledge and understanding for the reindeer husbandry. The Centre contributes to maintain and develop sustainable reindeer husbandry in the northern areas, and strengthen the cooperation with reindeer herders in other countries. The Centre works well and has become an important actor in the North. “

 

The Centre contributes to the development of a new knowledge base for indigenous communities’ adaptation to the major changes in the Arctic. The Centre works with people-to-people cooperation and civil society from Alaska and Canada in the west to Mongolia and China in the east. Today, 10 years after its establishment, many reindeer herding youth from the northern areas attend in exchange programes organized by ICR. The Centre is now working with reindeer husbandry’s adaptation to climate changes and food culture in the Arctic Council. “… The establishment of ICR has significantly strengthened our opportunities for international people-to-people cooperation, exchange of information, recognition of our traditional knowledge, and the protection of indigenous communities in the circumpolar North,” said the General Secretary of WRH, Mr. Johan Mathis Turi. “… This is crucial for world reindeer herders, and thus the establishment of ICR is a great success”, he concludes.

19_73-sak1a-bilde2

ICR will celebrate its 10th anniversary through a series of events in Norway and other reindeer herding countries during the period of 2 September 2015 to 2 September 2016.

 

ICR is a contribution of the first white paper to the Norwegian Parliament in 2004/05. The Centre is organized as a governmental body with special powers, and receives today their basic funding from the state budget through the Ministry of Local Government and Moderination. The Centre is located in Kautokeino, Norway, with offices in Eastern Siberia, Russia and Canada.

More information: Director, Mr. Anders Oskal, Internasjonal Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (ICR)

Tel. +47 994 50010. Email: ax@reindeercentre.org Chair of the Board, Mrs. Inger A. Smuk, International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (ICR) Tel.+47 915 43934. Email: ias@reindeercentre.org

Secretary General, Mr. Johan Mathis Turi, Association of World Reindeer Herders (WRH)

Tel. +47 950 48331. Email: jmturi@gmail.com

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR REINDEER HUSBANDRY – OPNING SEPTEMBER 2, 2005

By the Minister of Local government and Regional Development, Mrs. Erna Solberg

Dear organizers, guests and audience It is a pleasure for me, as the Minister for both the Sámi and the minorities, on behalf of the Norwegian Government, to open a new International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry, located in Kautokeino. This Centre will add a new dimension to the cooperation between both the Sami interests and us, and in the Arctic Council and the Barents Cooperation.

 

The Government thinks it is of importance that the reindeer herders and their organizations have a close relationship to the Centre. We have therefore emphasized that the Centre is to be established and ran in cooperation with the Association of World Reindeer Herders. We have also been concerned to continue and strengthen the cross-border cooperation between reindeer herders. The Sámi reindeer husbandry was established long before we drew the borders between the state, and it is then essential to have a transnational cooperation in the years ahead. Reindeer herding organizations from both Russia, Finland, Sweden and Norway are thus represented in the board and they are thus invited to take part in developing and running the centre forward.

 

The establishment of the Centre is a contribution from Norway to continue and strengthen the international cooperation between reindeer herders that was initiated for the first time 15 years ago by representatives from the reindeer husbandry. The cooperation includes today 20 different ethnic groups/nations who practice reindeer husbandry in large geographical areas in three continents and in totally 9 national states, from China and Mongolia in the east to Alaska and Canada in the west.

 

The Centre will be a key hub for dissemination and exchange of information, experiences and knowledge between world reindeer herders, – and between reindeer herders and the outside world. We all need to learn more about reindeer husbandry in the Arctic and subarctic regions.

 

I am glad that my participation today can be regarded as proof that the Centre already at the start have found their communication tools. It is nice for me to participate online and open the Centre in Kautokeino while I physically am located 2000 kilometres away.

 

It is particularly pleasing to note that the Centre, representing a traditional industry, take active use of highly developed technology. New technology is not a strange element in the industry – just look at for example the binoculars, snowmobile and ATVs (all-terrain vehicles), which are here to stay in the work of reindeer husbandry.

 

As known, reindeer herding, as a circumpolar industry residing in the marginal arctic regions, has developed a distinctive traditional knowledge and adaptation. In the practice of the industry, the herders have through the ages acquired experiences and valuable knowledge that make the basis of the operations of the industry in relation to the nature, the climate and the environment, animals and animal protection and harvesting and management of natural resources. Without adopting this peculiar traditional knowledge, it would be difficult, or impossible, for the herders to succeed in the industry, especially when taking into account the natural conditions in which the industry operates.

 

Traditional knowledge is rarely recorded, but delivered orally from generation to generation. An important task for the Centre will be to document the traditional knowledge in the different regions. Too often, we experience that this type of traditional knowledge disappears from our society, because we have other ways to safeguard knowledge than what has been traditional. Equally important is that traditional knowledge is disseminated and made known between the different indigenous people. It is particularly crucial that the knowledge is accepted and used in educational systems, in research and, not at least, in public management. We have made little use of reindeer husbandry’s own experience and knowledge in our way to manage reindeer husbandry in Norway in the last 30 years. The aim must be that future generations recognize the value of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge as important skills for harvesting and management of the nature, the climate and the environment. The aim must also be to achieve a better and more appropriate management of indigenous livelihoods and areas in which the indigenous peoples live.

 

With these words, I declare the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry opened. I wish the board of the Centre, the reindeer herders and their organizations and other partners, good luck with the work ahead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RIIKKAIDGASKASAŠ BOAZODOALLOGUOVDDÁŠ – RAHPAN ČAKČAMÁNU 2.B. 2005

Svein MathiesenBlog, EALLU, ICR/WRH, Nomadic HerdersLeave a comment

 

Gielda- ja guovloministtar Erna Solberg bokte

Buorre lágideaddjit, guossit ja oasseváldit!

Lea illun munnje, sihke sáme- ja minoritehtaministtarin, Norgga ráđđehusa bealis rahpat ođđa Riikkaidgaskasaš boazodoalloguovddáža Guovdageainnus. Dát19_73-sak1a-bilde3 guovddáš buktá ođđa dimenšuvnna ovttasbargui min ja sámi beroštumiid gaskka, Árktalaš Ráđis ja Barentsovttasbarggus.

 

Ráđđehusa oainnu mielde lea dehálaš ahte boazoálbmogat ja daid searvvit dovdet lagas oktavuođa guovddážii. Mii leat danin deattuhan ahte guovddáš ásahuvvo ja jođihuvvo ovttas Máilmmi Boazoálbmogiid Servviin. Mis lea leamaš beroštupmi joatkit ja nannet boazodoalu rájáidrasttideaddji ovttasbarggu. Sámi boazodoallu álggahuvvui mihá ovdal go mii mearrideimmet riikkarájáid, ja dalle lea dehálaš ahte gávdno rájáidrasttideaddji ovttasbargu boahtteáiggis. Danin leat sihke Ruošša, Suoma, Ruoŧa ja Norgga boazodoalloservviin ovddasteaddjit guovddáža stivrras, ja searvvit leat dainna lágiin bovdejuvvon oasálastit guovddáža ovdánahttimis ja doaimmain ovddosguovlluid.

Guovddáža ásaheapmi lea oassi Norgga áigumušain joatkkit ja nannet boazodoalu riikkaidgaskasaš ovttasbarggu, man ealáhusa ovddasteaddjit álggahedje 15 jagi dás ovdal. Ovttasbargu guoská dál 20 iešguđet čearddalaš álbmotjoavkkuide ja álbmogiidda, geat barget boazodoaluin viiddis geográfalaš guovlluin 3 máilmmiossodagain oktiibuot 9 stáhtain, Kinna ja Mongolia rájes nuortan gitta Alaskai ja Kanadai oarjin.

 

Guovddáš galgá leat čanastatbáiki dieđuid, vásáhusaid ja máhtu juohkimis ja gaskkusteamis máilmmi boazoálbmogiid gaskka, ja boazodoalu ja máilmmi gaskka. Mii dárbbašat buohkat oahppat eambbo árktalaš ja subárktalaš boazodoalu birra.

 

Mun lea ilus ahte mu oasálastin dál sáhttá leat duođaštussan dasa ahte guovddáš juo ásadettiin lea gávdnan iežas gulahallanneavvu. Lea somá munnje oasálastit interneahta bokte ja rahpat guovddáža Guovdageainnus vaikko ieš fysalaččat lean 200 miilla eret Guovdageainnus.

 

Lea erenoamáš somá oažžut duođaštuvvot ahte guovddáš, mii ovddasta árbevirolaš ealáhusa, váldá atnui ođđa teknologiija. Ođđa teknologiija ii lea ođas ealáhussii, geahča mat ovdamearkka dihte giikana, skohtera ja bievlavuodjinfievrruid, maid ealáhus leat váldán atnui.

 

Nugo diehtit lea boazodoallu, mii lea sirkumpolára ealáhus marginála árktalaš guovlluin, ovdánahttán iežas árbevirolaš máhtu ja heivehemiid. Ealáhusa doaimmaid oktavuođas leat boazoálbmogat áiggiid čađa čohkken vásáhusaid ja dehálaš máhtu, mii lea vuođđun ealáhusa doaibmavugiide luonddu, dálkkádaga ja birrasa dáfus, elliid ja elliidsuodjalus ja luondduriggodagaid ávkkástallama ja hálddašeami dáfus. Jos ii livččii ávkkástallama dán erenoamáš árbevirolaš máhtu, de livččii leamaš váttis dahje veadjemeahttun boazoálbmogiidda lihkostuvvat ealáhusain, erenoamážit go jurddašat makkár luonddubeales eavttuiguin ealáhus jođihuvvo.

Árbevirolaš máhttu lea hárve čálalaččat vurkejuvvon, muhto sirddihuvvon njálmmálaččat buolvvas bulvii. Okta dehálaš bárgu guovddážis lea duođaštit árbevirolaš máhtu iešguđet guovllus. Beare dávjá vásihat mii ahte dákkár árbevirolaš máhttu jávká min servodagas danin go mii leat gávdnan eará vugiid mo vurket máhtu dál go dan mii lea leamaš árbevirolaš. Lihkka dehálaš lea ahte árbevirolaš máhttu juhkkojuvvo ja dahkko dovddusin álgoálbmogiid gaskka. Lea erenoamáš mearrideaddjin ahte máhttu dohkkehuvvo ja váldo atnui oahpahusvuogádagain, dutkamis ja erenoamážit almmolaš hálddašeamis. Mii leat beare unnán váldán atnui boazodoalu iežas vásáhusaid ja máhtu iežamet boazodoallohálddašeamis Norggas daid maŋimuš 30 jagis. Ulbmil berret leat ahte boahttevaš buolvvat oidnet ahte álgoálbmogiid árbevirolaš máhtu árvu lea dehálaš gealbun biebmoháhkamis luonddus ja luonddu, dálkkádaga ja birashálddašeamis. Ulbmil berre maid leat oažžut buoret ja riektáset hálddašeami álgoálbmotealáhusain ja dain guovlluin gos álgoálbmogat ásset.

 

Dáigguin sániiguin raban Riikkaidgaskasaš boazodoalloguovddáža. Mun sávan guovddáža stivrrii, boazoálbmogiidda ja sin servviide ja eará bargoguimmiide lihkku bargguin ovddosguovlluid.

 

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International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry in Kautokeino opened by the current Prime Minister of Norway 10 years ago today

International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (ICR) in Kautokeino was opened by then the Minister of Local Governement and Regional Development, Mrs. Erna Solberg on September 2, 2005.

In her opening speech, Mrs. Solberg stressed that the establishment of the Centre is a contribution from Norway to maintain and strengthen the international cooperation in reindeer husbandry, and that it would add another dimension to the cooperation of the Arctic Council and the Barents Region. She also emphasized that the Government considers it important that the reindeer herders and their organizations have a close relationship to the Centre: “… We have therefore emphasized that the Centre to be established and operated in cooperation with the Association of World Reindeer Herders (WRH).”

Mrs. Solberg also emphasized the importance of traditional knowledge of reindeer husbandry in her opening speech: “… It is particularly crucial that the knowledge is accepted and used in education systems, research and, not at least, in public management. We have made little use of reindeer husbandry’s own experience and knowledge in our management of reindeer husbandry in Norway in the last 30 years,” said Mrs. Solberg before she rounded:” … The goal must be that future generations recognize the value of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge as essential skills in harvesting and management of nature, climate and environment. The aim must be to achieve a better and more appropriate management of indigenous livelihoods and areas in which the indigenous peoples live.»

The Government was also represented by the Minister of Children and Family Affairs, Mrs. Laila Dåvøy, State Secretary, Mrs. Ellen Inga O Hætta in the Ministery of Local Government and Regional Development, and State Secretary, Mr. Vidar Helgesen in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the opening ceremony in Kautokeino in 2005.

 

In the anniversary year 2015, ten years after the opening of the ICR, the Prime Minister of Norway, Mrs. Erna Solberg said in her speech at the Sami Parliament’s plenary, 3 July:

“… The International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry – which was established in 2005 – has also contributed in promoting knowledge and understanding for the reindeer husbandry. The Centre contributes to maintain and develop sustainable reindeer husbandry in the northern areas, and strengthen the cooperation with reindeer herders in other countries. The Centre works well and has become an important actor in the North. “

19_73-sak1a-bilde3 19_73-sak1a-bilde2

The Centre contributes to the development of a new knowledge base for indigenous communities’ adaptation to the major changes in the Arctic. The Centre works with people-to-people cooperation and civil society from Alaska and Canada in the west to Mongolia and China in the east. Today, 10 years after its establishment, many reindeer herding youth from the northern areas attend in exchange programmes organized by ICR. The Centre is now working with reindeer husbandry’s adaptation to climate changes and food culture in the Arctic Council. “… The establishment of ICR has significantly strengthened our opportunities for international people-to-people cooperation, exchange of information, recognition of our traditional knowledge, and the protection of indigenous communities in the circumpolar North,” said the General Secretary of WRH, Mr. Johan Mathis Turi. “… This is crucial for world reindeer herders, and thus the establishment of ICR is a great success”, he concludes.

 

ICR will celebrate its 10th anniversary through a series of events in Norway and other reindeer herding countries during the period of 2 September 2015 to 2 September 2016.

 

 

ICR is a contribution of the first white paper to the Norwegian Parliament in 2004/05. The Centre is organized as a governmental body with special powers, and receives today their basic funding from the state budget through the Ministry of Local Government and Moderination. The Centre is located in Kautokeino, Norway, with offices in Eastern Siberia, Russia and Canada.

 

 

More information: Director, Mr. Anders Oskal, Internasjonal Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (ICR)

Tel. +47 994 50010. Email: ax@reindeercentre.orgChair of the Board, Mrs. Inger A. Smuk, International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (ICR) Tel.+47 915 43934. Email: ias@reindeercentre.org Secretary General, Mr. Johan Mathis Turi, Association of World Reindeer Herders (WRH) Tel. +47 950 48331. Email: jmturi@gmail.com

 

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR REINDEER HUSBANDRY – OPNING SEPTEMBER 2, 2005

By the Minister of Local government and Regional Development, Mrs. Erna Solberg

Dear organizers, guests and audience!

It is a pleasure for me, as the Minister for both the Sámi and the minorities, on behalf of the Norwegian Government, to open a new International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry, located in Kautokeino. This Centre will add a new dimension to the cooperation between both the Sami interests and us, and in the Arctic Council and the Barents Cooperation.

 

The Government thinks it is of importance that the reindeer herders and their organizations have a close relationship to the Centre. We have therefore emphasized that the Centre is to be established and ran in cooperation with the Association of World Reindeer Herders. We have also been concerned to continue and strengthen the cross-border cooperation between reindeer herders. The Sámi reindeer husbandry was established long before we drew the borders between the state, and it is then essential to have a transnational cooperation in the years ahead. Reindeer herding organizations from both Russia, Finland, Sweden and Norway are thus represented in the board and they are thus invited to take part in developing and running the centre forward.

 

The establishment of the Centre is a contribution from Norway to continue and strengthen the international cooperation between reindeer herders that was initiated for the first time 15 years ago by representatives from the reindeer husbandry. The cooperation includes today 20 different ethnic groups/nations who practice reindeer husbandry in large geographical areas in three continents and in totally 9 national states, from China and Mongolia in the east to Alaska and Canada in the west.

 

The Centre will be a key hub for dissemination and exchange of information, experiences and knowledge between world reindeer herders, – and between reindeer herders and the outside world. We all need to learn more about reindeer husbandry in the Arctic and subarctic regions.

 

I am glad that my participation today can be regarded as proof that the Centre already at the start have found their communication tools. It is nice for me to participate online and open the Centre in Kautokeino while I physically am located 2000 kilometres away.

 

It is particularly pleasing to note that the Centre, representing a traditional industry, take active use of highly developed technology. New technology is not a strange element in the industry – just look at for example the binoculars, snowmobile and ATVs (all-terrain vehicles), which are here to stay in the work of reindeer husbandry.

 

As known, reindeer herding, as a circumpolar industry residing in the marginal arctic regions, has developed a distinctive traditional knowledge and adaptation. In the practice of the industry, the herders have through the ages acquired experiences and valuable knowledge that make the basis of the operations of the industry in relation to the nature, the climate and the environment, animals and animal protection and harvesting and management of natural resources. Without adopting this peculiar traditional knowledge, it would be difficult, or impossible, for the herders to succeed in the industry, especially when taking into account the natural conditions in which the industry operates.

 

Traditional knowledge is rarely recorded, but delivered orally from generation to generation. An important task for the Centre will be to document the traditional knowledge in the different regions. Too often, we experience that this type of traditional knowledge disappears from our society, because we have other ways to safeguard knowledge than what has been traditional. Equally important is that traditional knowledge is disseminated and made known between the different indigenous people. It is particularly crucial that the knowledge is accepted and used in educational systems, in research and, not at least, in public management. We have made little use of reindeer husbandry’s own experience and knowledge in our way to manage reindeer husbandry in Norway in the last 30 years. The aim must be that future generations recognize the value of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge as important skills for harvesting and management of the nature, the climate and the environment. The aim must also be to achieve a better and more appropriate management of indigenous livelihoods and areas in which the indigenous peoples live.

 

With these words, I declare the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry opened. I wish the board of the Centre, the reindeer herders and their organizations and other partners, good luck with the work ahead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internasjonalt reindriftssenter i Kautokeino åpnet av Erna Solberg for 10 år siden i dag

Internasjonalt reindriftssenter (ICR) i Kautokeino ble åpnet av daværende Kommunal- og regionalminister Erna Solberg den 2. september 2005.

I sin åpningstale understreket Solberg at etableringen av senteret er et bidrag fra Norge til å videreføre og styrke det internasjonale reindriftssamarbeidet, og at det ville tilføre en ny dimensjon til samarbeidet i Arktisk Råd og Barentsregionen. Hun vektla også at det etter Regjeringens syn er det viktig at reindriftsfolk og deres organisasjoner har et nært forhold til senteret: ”…Vi har derfor lagt vekt på at senteret etableres og drives i samråd med Verdensforbundet for reindriftsfolk.”

 

 

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Bilde: Åpningen av ICR 2 September 2005 i Kautokeino med minister Laila Dåvøy, statssekretær Vidar Helgesen, statssekretør Ellen Inga O Hetta,  Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, mfl.

Solberg vektla også viktigheten av reindriftens tradisjonelle kunnskap i åpningstalen: ”…Det er særlig avgjørende at kunnskapen blir akseptert og tatt i bruk i utdanningssystemer, i forskningen og ikke minst i den offentlige forvaltningen. Vi har tatt lite i bruk reindriftens egne erfaring og kunnskaper i måten vi har forvaltet reindriften på i Norge i de siste 30 årene”, sa Solberg før hun avrundet: ”…Målsettingen må være at fremtidige generasjoner ser verdien i urfolks tradisjonskunnskaper som viktig kompetanse for høsting og forvaltning av naturen, klimaet og miljøet. Målsettingen må også være å få til en bedre og mer riktig forvaltning av urfolksnæringer og av de områder urfolk bebor.”

 

Fra Regjeringen deltok også Barne- og familieminister Laila Dåvøy, statssekretær Ellen Inga O Hætta i KRD, samt statssekretær Vidar Helgesen i UD på åpningsarrangementet i Kautokeino.

I jubileumsåret 2015, ti år etter åpningen av ICR, uttalte Statsminister Erna Solberg følgende i sin tale til Sametingets plenum 3. juli:

“…Det internasjonale reindriftssenteret – som ble etablert i 2005 – har også bidratt til å fremme kunnskap om og forståelse for reindriftsnæringen. Senteret bidrar til å opprettholde og videreutvikle en bærekraftig reindrift i nordområdene, og styrker samarbeidet med reindriftsfolk i andre land. Senteret fungerer godt og har blitt en viktig aktør i nordområdene.”

Senteret bidrar til utvikling av et nytt kunnskapsgrunnlag for urfolkssamfunnenes tilpasning til de store endringene i Arktis. Senteret arbeider med folk-til-folk samarbeid og sivile samfunn fra Alaska og Canada i vest til Mongolia og Kina i øst. I dag, 10 år etter etableringen, deltar mange reindriftsungdom fra nordområdene i utvekslingsprogram i regi av ICR. Senteret arbeider nå med reindriftens klimatilpasning og matkultur i Arktisk råd. ”…Etableringen av ICR har vesentlig styrket våre muligheter for internasjonalt folk-til-folk samarbeid, informasjonsutveksling, anerkjennelse av vår tradisjonelle kunnskap, og ivaretakelse av urfolkssamfunnene i det sirkumpolare nord”, sier Generalsekretær Johan Mathis Turi i Verdensforbundet for reindriftsfolk (WRH).”…Dette er avgjørende for verdens reindriftsfolk, og slik sett er etableringen av ICR en stor suksess”, konkluderer han.

ICR vil markere sitt 10-årsjubileum gjennom en rekke arrangement i Norge og andre reindriftsland i perioden 2. september 2015 til 2. september 2016.

ICR er et tiltak fra den første nordområdemeldingen til Stortinget i 2004/05. Senteret er organisert som et statlig forvaltningsorgan med særskilte fullmakter, og får i dag sin basisfinansiering fra statsbudsjettet via Kommunal- og Moderniseringsdepartementet. Senteret er lokalisert i Kautokeino, med underkontorer i Øst-Sibir, Russland og Canada.

Ytterligere informasjon:

Styreleder Inger Anita Smuk, Internasjonalt reindriftssenter (ICR) Tlf. 915 43934. Epost ias@reindeercentre.org Direktør Anders Oskal, Internasjonalt reindriftssenter (ICR)Tlf. 994 50010. Epost ax@reindeercentre.org Generalsekretær Johan Mathis Turi, Verdensforbundet for reindriftsfolk (WRH) Tlf. 950 48331. Epost jmturi@gmail.com

Traskribering av Erna Solbergs tale fra 2005:

INTERNASJONALT FAG- OG FORMIDLINGSSENTER FOR REINDRIFT – ÅPNING 2. SEPTEMBER 2005

ved kommunal- og regionalminister Erna Solberg

Kjære arrangører, gjester og forsamling!

Det er en glede for meg, både som same- og minoritetsstasråd, på vegne av den norske regjeringen, å åpne et nytt internasjonalt fag- og formidlingssenter for reindriften som er lokalisert til Kautokeino. Dette senteret vil tilføre en ny dimensjon til samarbeidet, både mellom oss og samiske interesser, og i Arktisk Råd og Barentssamarbeidet.

Etter Regjeringens syn er det viktig at reindriftsfolk og deres organisasjoner har et nært forhold til senteret. Vi har derfor lagt vekt på at senteret etableres og drives i samråd med Verdensforbundet for reindriftsfolk. Vi har også vært opptatt av å videreføre og styrke det grenseoverskridende reindriftssamarbeidet. Den samiske reindriften er etablert lenge før vi trakk grensene, og da er det viktig å også ha et grenseoverskridende samarbeid i årene fremover. Derfor er reindriftsorganisasjoner fra både Russland, Finland, Sverige og Norge representert i styret og de er på den måten invitert til å ta del i å utvikle og drive senteret fremover.

Etableringen av senteret er et bidrag fra Norge til å videreføre og styrke det internasjonale reindriftssamarbeidet som ble initiert første gang for 15 år siden av næringens representanter. Samarbeidet omfatter i dag 20 ulike etniske folkegrupper/folkeslag som utøver reindrift i store geografiske områder i 3 verdensdeler og i til sammen 9 stater fra Kina og Mongolia i øst til Alaska og Canada i vest.

Senteret skal være som et knutepunkt for formidling og utveksling av informasjon, erfaringer og kunnskap verdens reindriftsfolk i mellom, – og mellom reindriftsfolk og omverdenen. Vi trenger alle å lære mer om reindriften i hele den subarktiske og den arktiske del på den nordlige jordklode.

Jeg er glad for at min deltakelse i dag kan framstå som et bevis på at senteret allerede ved oppstarten har funnet sitt kommunikasjonsverktøy. Det er hyggelig for meg å kunne delta på nett og åpne senteret i Kautokeino samtidig som jeg fysisk befinner meg 200 mil unna.

Det er ekstra hyggelig å konstatere at senteret som representerer en tradisjonell næring, tar aktivt i bruk høytutviklet teknologi. Ny teknologi er ikke et fremmed element i næringen, se bare på for eksempel kikkerten, snøscooteren og barmarkskjøretøyer, som er kommet for å bli i næringsutøvelsen.

Som kjent, har reindriften, som en sirkumpolar næring med tilhold i marginale arktiske områder, utviklet en særegne tradisjonelle kunnskaper og tilpasning. Ved utøvelsen av næringen, har reindriftsfolk gjennom tidene tilegnet seg erfaringer og verdifulle kunnskaper som er lagt til grunn i næringens driftsformer i forholdet til naturen, klimaet og miljøet, dyr og dyrevern og høsting og forvaltning av naturressursene. Uten å ta i bruk denne særegne tradisjonskunnskapen, ville det vært vanskelig, eller umulig, for reindriftsfolk å lykkes med næringen, særlig når vi tar i betraktning de naturgitte betingelser som næringen drives under.

Tradisjonskunnskap er sjelden nedtegnet, men overleveres muntlig fra generasjon til generasjon. En viktig oppgave for senteret, vil bli å dokumentere de tradisjonelle kunnskapene i ulike regionene. Altfor ofte opplever vi at den typen av tradisjonell kunnskapen forsvinner fra vårt samfunn, fordi vi har andre måter å ivareta kunnskapen enn det som har vært det tradisjonelle. Like viktig er det at tradisjonskunnskapen spres og gjøres kjent urfolk i mellom. Det er særlig avgjørende at kunnskapen blir akseptert og tatt i bruk i utdanningssystemer, i forskningen og ikke minst i den offentlige forvaltningen. Vi har tatt lite i bruk reindriftens egne erfaring og kunnskaper i måten vi har forvaltet reindriften på i Norge i de siste 30 årene. Målsettingen må være at fremtidige generasjoner ser verdien i urfolks tradisjonskunnskaper som viktig kompetanse for høsting og forvaltning av naturen, klimaet og miljøet. Målsettingen må også være å få til en bedre og mer riktig forvaltning av urfolksnæringer og av de områder urfolk bebor.

Med disse ord erklærer jeg det internasjonale fag- og formidlingssenteret for reindriften for åpnet. Jeg ønsker senterets styre, reindriftsfolk med deres organisasjoner og andre samarbeidspartnere til lykke med arbeidet fremover.

 

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Learning Evenki traditional knowledge to make blood sausage from wild reindeer

August 29, 2015 • Svein MathiesenBlogLeave a comment

As part of the Arctic Council workshop in Khatystyr, EALLU- Arctic Indigenous Youth, Climate Change and Food Culture few days ago we learn how to use Evenki traditional knowledge to make blood sausage from wild taiga reindeer.

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Nomadic Herders project met Evenki reindeer herders in Khatystyr, Sakha (Yakutia), Eastern Siberia

August 28, 2015 • Svein MathiesenNomadic Herders, ProjectsLeave a comment

Recently GEF UNEP Nomadic Herders project: Enhancing the resilience of reindeer herders’

ecosystems and livelihoods met with Evenki reindeer herders in one of the Taiga model area in

the project to prepare these indigenous peoples for implementation (pictures below).  Nomadic

Herders is also endorsed by Arctic Council in CAFF and will  soon provide a international

bachelor course in méthodes used to document traditional  knowledge related to biodiversity

issues. The course is financially supported by Ministry of Climate and Environment in

Norway. The taiga region globally is challenged by climate and biodiversity change which affect

indigenous peoples society.

Brigade 7 Khatysyr

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New Article from DÁVGGAS Project: Seeing Like the State or the Pastoralists?

July 29, 2015 • Philip BurgessBlog, Dávggas, ProjectsLeave a comment

Finnmark_county_mapA new academic article has recently been  published from the DÁVGGAS project. Entitled “Seeing like the state or like pastoralists? Conflicting narratives on the governance of Sámi reindeer husbandry in Finnmark, Norway” The article is authored by by ,  and & Inger Marie Gaup Eira and will published in the Norwegian Journal of Geography.

From the abstract:

The article examines key actors’ perceptions on why Norwegian policy objectives aimed at securing sustainable reindeer husbandry through participation have failed in West Finnmark. Based on government documents, media debates, and interviews with the actors, the authors identify two competing narratives on why there are ‘too many reindeer’ despite continued state efforts at destocking.

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UArctic Shared Voices Magazine on EALLIN

July 28, 2015 • Philip BurgessBlog, EALLIN, Projects, UArctic EALAT InstituteLeave a comment

Creating the Good LifeThe annual UArctic Shared Voices magazine has been published and is now available online. There is a short article by Mikhail Pogodaev and Philip Burgess about the EALLIN project and there is also a short interview with EALLIN participant Isak Turi.

You can download the 2015 Shared Voices magazine here.

In addition, UArctic’s Shared Voices newsletter is sent monthly to keep those interested in UArctic informed about its activities and development. The June/July edition headlines are below.

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To preserve taiga reindeer husbandry. Round table in Ulan-Ude

June 23, 2015 • Alena GerasimovaBlog, ICR/WRH, Nomadic HerdersLeave a comment
Ulan-Ude seminar

Participants of the round-table

June 18, Ulan-Ude, Russia. The Buryat State University hosted an international round table devoted to preservation and development of taiga reindeer husbandry. The seminar was organized by the Association of World Reindeer Herders (WRH) together with the Association of Northern Indigenous Peoples of Republic Buryatia and UArcitc EALAT Institute under the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry (Norway).

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WRH takes part at the Council meeting of UArctic in Buryatia, Russia

June 15, 2015 • Alena GerasimovaICR/WRH, ProjectsLeave a comment
Elena Antipina_1

Elena Antipina, the director of the Arctic College of the People of the North

June 14-18, the 18th Council Meeting of University of Arctic is held at the Buryat State University in the city of Ulan-Ude, the capital of the Republic of Buryatia, Russia. More than 70 delegates from 15 countries arrived to Buryatia. Within the Council Meeting the Buryat State University will host the joint science and education conference “Arctic Dialog in the Global World”. The conference brings together interested scientists, politicians, academics, business people, PhD and postgraduate students from all over the world.

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